Frontier Birding Israel style

Still haven’t purchased a proper sound-recording system, but with my phone (Samsung Galaxy S2) I manage to get semi-decent recordings of close birds.

Here are some of my adventures in recent weeks:

On February 9th I had a picnic with my family in a small wood behind my house, which is at Nir Moshe, in the northern Negev. I heard the familiar call of a Hume’s Warbler – ‘chu-wit’. The bird was calling really intensively, but I was unable to see the bird. I did get this recording which enabled me to identify the bird without seeing it. However a few days later I managed to ring the bird.

humes1

A couple of weeks earlier, on January 21st, I walked with my younger son in the same wood near my house. I had a pipit calling from a tall eucalyptus. I didn’t have my bins with me but had my phone – again managed to record the bird, and after consulting with MG concluded it was an Olive-backed Pipit. This is what Martin wrote to me after listening to the awful recording: “The pitch reaches up to 8 kHz and has fading quality to it – just like an OBP. Tree Pipit pitches around 7 kHz and has strongly modulated end with less fading”. Thanks Martin.

Olive-backed Pipit Israel 21 January 2013 Yoav PerlmanThis image was taken in November 2012 – quite a few birds overwintering in Israel. This is from Elkana.

Olive-backed Pipit

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Israel, Pipits, Uncategorized, Warblers and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Frontier Birding Israel style

  1. Ralph Martin says:

    Hi Yoav, hi Martin,

    I just saw your recording of the presumed Olive-backed Pipit.
    In fact I don’t think this bird to be one! I saw a lot of sonograms of the calls the last days and this one really looks like Tree P. The bird shows also a strongly modulated end (but this character isn’t safe). I wrote an article about the identification of the Pipits:
    http://avesrares.wordpress.com/2013/09/27/identification-of-olive-backed-and-tree-pipit-by-call/
    If you use my method, you get a MSF of 7.4 kHz, a gradient of 6.9. Parameter 1 is then 51. All values fit nicely for Tree Pipit, but are quite extraordinary for Olive-backed Pipit. If you want to, send me the recording. I think it is good enough for a safe ID. The chance would be even better, if you have some more calls recorded of this bird.
    Best wishes,
    Ralph Martin

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s